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What They Should Know – Diabetes Blog Week Day 5

Diabetes Blog Week – Day 5

Our instructions:  “What is one thing you would tell someone that doesn’t have diabetes about living with diabetes?”.  Let’s do a little advocating and post what we wish people knew about diabetes.  Have more than one thing you wish people knew?  Go ahead and tell us everything.

Oh boy.  This topic immediately caused a nasty rant in my brain.  So much so that I had to put it aside and come back to it later, which means I didn’t get it posted yesterday on Day 5 of Diabetes Blog Week.

I don’t think the misinformation about Type 1 diabetes bothered me quite as much when it was just my husband.  After all, he’s an adult.  He can defend himself.  He can tell people to go climb a tree when they direct a ridiculous comment towards him.  But now, there’s a child involved.  And let me tell you, I can feel the steam coming out of my ears when someone says something stupid to him.  (i.e., random lady in store who says “maybe if he eats more healthy, diabetes will go away…”)

I know.  I shouldn’t expect every person to perfectly understand diabetes.  But that’s the thing, I don’t.  I just kindly wish people would keep their mouths shut when they don’t know what they are talking about.

I’m good if you want to ask questions.  That’s cool.  That means you want more information.  That means you care to learn.

I’m not good with inaccuracies stated as facts.

I guess if I had to choose one thing for people to understand, it would be that high and low blood sugar numbers are normal.  They can’t completely be avoided.  Their presence doesn’t mean mismanagement or poor care.

There are many factors that impact blood sugar.  Exercise may bring it down, but in some cases could bring it up.  Stress can bring it up.  Wrong carb count on restaurant website can lead to a major low.  Even if you perfectly count carbs and manage insulin intake, the resulting blood sugar may not be perfect.

I consider diabetes to be a “do the best you can” disease.  It will never go exactly as planned, but hopefully over time, there will be mostly good results and less of the bad stuff.

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One Thing to Improve – Diabetes Blog Week Day 3

Diabetes Blog Week Day 3

Our instructions:  Yesterday we gave ourselves and our loved ones a big pat on the back for one thing we are great at.  Today let’s look at the flip-side.  We probably all have one thing we could try to do better.  Why not make today the day we start working on it.  No judgments, no scolding, just sharing one small thing we can improve so the DOC can cheer us on!

This one was easy for me to pick.  One thing I would like to do better is help my guys dose their insulin BEFORE eating.  We do try to do this, but it is REALLY REALLY hard.  Partly because it requires planning.  Mostly because it is almost impossible to convince a hungry  person he should wait 10-15 minutes after calculating carbs and dosing insulin to eat.

When the little guy was diagnosed, we were given these instructions:

1.  Check blood sugar

2.  Dose insulin for food based on carb count, including any correction dose for high sugar

3.  Take the first two numbers of the blood sugar reading.  This is how many minutes after taking insulin you should wait to eat your food.  (for example, if blood sugar is 130, you would take insulin and then wait 13 minutes to eat)

The reason for doing this is that insulin takes 30-90 minutes to get working and even reach its peak in your system.  Taking the insulin before eating avoids blood sugar spikes after your meal or snack.  Ultimately, doing just this one thing can  help lower the A1C result, a definite goal for us.

Sounds great.  Simple to calculate.  Easy to recognize the benefit.  Difficult to implement in real life.  Especially with a kiddo who’s convinced he is “starving” and is watching his brother and sister scarf down their food while he waits.

So, this is what I’d like to improve for us.   I know with a little work we can get much better at this.

I’d really love to hear how this goes for others.  I’m sure we aren’t the only families struggling with this issue.