Find A Friend – Diabetes Blog Week Day 1

This week is the 3rd annual Diabetes Blog Week.  I’ve only been blogging about this stuff for a couple of months, but what the heck, I’m going to “go for it”.

Each day of the week, there is a chosen topic for everyone participating.  Day 1 is “Find a Friend”.

Our instructions:   “It seems the most popular thing about Diabetes Blog Week is that it helps us find blogs we weren’t reading yet and connect with some new blog friends.  With that in mind, let’s kick off Diabetes Blog Week by making some new connections.  Think about the d-blogs you read that you think we may not know about and introduce us to one that you love!!  Let’s all find a new friend today! “

Wow.  Can you say impossible task?  There are so many amazing blogs out there.   Immediate decision made to change the word “one” in the above instructions to “a few”.

I’ve been a lurker in the DOC since right after my little guy was diagnosed.   (For those of you wondering, DOC is short for the Diabetes Online Community…it took me a while to figure this out).  More recently, I’ve become a regular follower of quite a few blogs, always looking forward to the next post delivered to my inbox.

I’m particularly  obsessed with the blogs written by parents of children with Type 1.   There is something oddly addictive about reading stories from others whilst nodding my head and saying to myself, “OMG..Yes, I know!  I’ve been there too.”  Aside from my husband and family, reading blogs written by other parents was my single most comforting activity after the little guy’s diagnosis.  I knew I wasn’t alone and for that, I was beyond grateful.

So, here it is.  A few of my favorites.

1.  Bigfoot Child Have Diabetes – So funny.   Makes me laugh every time.   Love the writing style and our kiddos are almost identical in age, gender and diagnosis date, so there is heavy head nodding in agreement.  Reminds me that a sense of humor is required when it comes to getting through each day.

2.  Arden’s Day – From a dad’s perspective.  Love the latest info on diabetes and am inspired by his desire to get involved by creating a new charity to provide insulin pumps and CGM’s to those less fortunate.

3.  Dog Goes to College – So inspirational to read about a successful young lady in college with Type 1.  Awesome place to learn about diabetic service dogs.  Amelia is a great role model for young people with Type 1.

Hope you’ll check these out, if you haven’t seen them already.  I’m looking forward to discovering a few new blogs myself this week!

How Many Sets Can A Wood Chuck Change if a Wood Chuck Could Change Sets?

I was thinking today about insulin pump set changes.

We have to change infusion sets every 2-3 days.  ( “we” really means “I”…..hehe).

As fate would have it, both my guys started on one aligned schedule, but that only lasted a couple of weeks.  A kinked cannula or unexplained high blood sugars means an immediate set change, completely screwing up my carefully mapped out plan.

One day, I decided to calculate how this all adds up.

10 set changes per month for each super handsome guy = 20 insulin pump set changes per month.

That’s insane!

Now add the CGM sensor change for my little guy on 5 of those 20 days.  (Extra big needle so we push the limit and he wears each sensor for 6 days instead of 3).

Good thing I have this stuff mastered.  The insulin pump has nothing on us.

P.S.:

This week, I’ll be participating in the 3rd annual Diabetes Blog Week.  That means diabetes bloggers around the world will be blogging on a set topic each day of the week.  More information can be found here:  http://www.bittersweetdiabetes.com/2012/05/third-annual-diabetes-blog-week.html

Happy Reading!

It Gets Better

My son was diagnosed with Type 1 last July, while we were on vacation in Florida.  After reading the stories of others, I consider ourselves lucky.  No DKA and  we only spent two nights in the hospital.

When he was discharged, I remember driving away from the hospital with an overwhelming sense of panic.    I felt so helpless.   Only two days spent learning how to keep him alive.  It didn’t seem like enough time.  All of the information was spinning around in my head.  I could only think to myself  “How are we going to do this?” Of course, I didn’t say that out loud.  I didn’t want to scare him.  I didn’t want him to feel the fear I was feeling.

It didn’t even matter that my husband of 9 years had Type 1.  I felt like I knew nothing.

He was starving.  He begged for something besides hospital food, but I wouldn’t even consider fast food drive through because I didn’t know the exact carb counts of the food.  (duh, you can look them up)

He fell asleep on the hour drive to my mother-in-law’s house and instant alarms went off in my head….Is he high?  Is he low?  Should I climb into the back seat of the rental car and check his sugar?  I felt so out of control.

On the radio, a song played and she was singing my thoughts…

“Can we pretend that airplanes in the night sky are like shooting stars?  I could really use a wish right now, a wish right now.”

I would have given anything at that moment for one wish….

It’s been nearly 10 months since his diagnosis.  Now, things seem normal.  We are calm.  We know what to do and when to do it.

Today, he had his quarterly endo appointment.  The hour drive in bumper to bumper traffic stunk, but the 6.4 A1C result was worth it.  When I heard the number, I smiled.

A lot of days I feel like a failure.  I fault myself for the highs and lows.   I blame myself for miscounting carbs or underestimating the impact of exercise.

But today……today was good…..I’m still smiling!

Pump Fail

420…well, that’s fun.  (initiate instant mommy failure feeling)

We started out okay.

6am 114   (whooo hoo!!)

9am 235 (normal post-breakfast spike we cannot manage to overcome)

11:30am 165  (ok, I’ll take it)

1:45pm 306   (WHAT??!!??)   correction bolus

3:45pm 233 (well, at least it’s coming down)  correction bolus + snack bolus,  painfully wait 23 minutes before eating snack

5:30pm 420 (panic…breathe…retest in hopes of sugary fingers)…374  (darn, fingers not too sugary)    correction bolus

6:30pm 364   (panic again….injection with syringe…..change pump set after kiddo confesses pump dropped and yanked cord TWICE today while at school)

Hate having to change the pump set when I just did it yesterday   (ARRGGHH!)  …. but thank the lucky stars for numbing cream.

Now we wait….(mentally accepting neurotic mommy tendency that will drive me to check BS every 2-3 hours overnight…YAWN…zzzzz)

Trash

I cannot believe the amount of trash that comes from one pump set and sensor change.  It amazes me every time.  When we go to the Barbara Davis Center in Denver, they always have artwork made out of test strip bottles and pump parts, etc.  I wish we could make something cool of all this junk, but alas, into the trash it goes.

First “Almost-Perfect” Day

My little guy has been on the pump since January of this year.   So far, the experience has been great.  I will admit, I was a little overwhelmed when we went through the training.  So much information at once, sometimes with scary warnings…

“Don’t disconnect this way”

“No roller coasters”

“Watch out when going through airport security and riding on a plane”

“No cold insulin and watch those air bubbles”

etc., etc., etc.

It helped to know that hubby would be trying out the pump also, so they could go through it together.   Now, after several months, we have the hang of it and I can change a pump set in no time flat.

While the overall pump process was great, getting the settings right has been a rough road for my son.  Activity at school is so varied, one day he would be high, the next low.  The school calls me up to three times a day after he checks his sugar before morning snack, before lunch and before coming home on the bus.  Every day has been an adventure.  The worst part of it all was knowing what he was going through.  It may seem like fun to get out of class, but it stinks to miss lunch with your friends or to be just plain different.

But FINALLY, we had an (almost) perfect day.

Wake up:  116

Before morning snack:  124

Before lunch:  109

Before coming home on bus:  176

I’ll take it!  I felt like throwing a party.  Hooray!